ARTICLE TAG

Miranda rights

12/15/2020

Videotaped Interrogations and Fee Waivers: New York Expands Juvenile Justice Reforms

The Central Park Five reunited for the first time at a 2012 screening of a documentary about their wrongful convictions. From left: Yusef Salaam, Antron McCray, Kevin Richardson, Raymond Santana Jr.

8/5/2020

California Bill Seeks Strengthened Miranda Rights for Minors

Children and teens aged 17 and younger detained by police would have the right to consult a lawyer before being interrogated by police, under a California bill moving toward passage by the state Legislature. If the bill becomes law, California would be the first state in the nation to require such protections.

Columbia University Report Backs Overhaul of Colorado’s Juvenile Justice Approach

10/12/2017

California Governor Signs Package of Juvenile Justice Bills

California Gov. Jerry Brown signed a slate of seven juvenile justice bills into law on Wednesday, highlighting a push for sentencing reform and greater support for the rights of youth and families involved with the justice system.

5/26/2017

Rights Relinquished: How 25 Hours Became 21 Years for Jerome Dixon

A California bill seeks to protect the rights of minors in high-pressure interrogation situations during criminal investigations. On July 25th, 1990, the course of Jerome Dixon’s life changed forever. After 25 hours of interrogation, the then 17-year-old Oakland youth would find himself sentenced to decades in prison.

Connecticut may raise the juvenile arrest age from 7 to 10.

10/12/2016

Round-up of California Juvenile Justice Legislation for 2016

Originally published by Witness LA from September 28 to October 4. This was part of a longer round-up of California legislation on Witness LA.  Juvenile Justice Data-Gathering A bill that aims to standardize the way California’s local probation departments gather and report data on the kids in the juvenile justice system, AB 1998, made it past Gov.

8/1/2016

California Bill Says a 10-Year-Old Cannot Waive Miranda Rights

Early one morning in 2011, a 10-year-old Riverside boy named Joseph woke up, went downstairs and grabbed a .357 revolver from his parents’ bedroom closet. He walked over to the living-room couch where his white supremacist father was sleeping off a night of drinking and shot him in the head.